Cub Scout Belt Loops


During a lock-in, Cub Scouts can complete some or most requirements for one Belt Loop. All scouts participate in the same activity and earn their belt loops together as a group. Groups will select one program and complete the requirements guided by Museum staff.

Be prepared for fun and achievement!

Cub Scouts of America take note! Now you can work towards a belt loop at our Scout Workshops conveniently located in downtown Chattanooga, Tennessee. We will take care of all the details, including the staff instruction, planning, and meals.

During a lock-in, Cub Scouts can complete some or most requirements for one Belt Loop. All scouts participate in the same activity and earn their badges together as a group. Groups will select one program and complete the requirements guided by Museum staff.

We offer lock-in programs for Girl Scouts Juniors, Girl Scout Brownies and Boy Scout Webelos as well.

CUb scout belt loops

  • Geology: Define geology and explain what it means to a partner. Collect samples of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and explain how each was formed. Collect minerals and explain what a mineral is to a partner. To earn the Geology pin, groups will complete all of the above plus make a pet rock by using glue-on eyes and paint. Tell a creative story about your pet rock. Make a collection of five different fossils and identify them. Draw the inside of a cave showing the difference between stalactites and stalagmites.
  • Astronomy: Setup and demonstrate how to focus a simple telescope or binoculars. Draw a diagram of our solar system and identify the planets. Explain the necessary space vocabulary. To earn the Astronomy pin, groups will also draw a diagram of a telescope and explain how it works. Draw and label five constellations and find them in the night sky. Find the North Star and explain why it is important. Visit our Star Lab Planetarium and talk with your Den about what you have learned. Locate three major observatories and find their position on a map.
  • Art: Make a list of common materials used to create visual art compositions. Identify three primary colors and three secondary colors. Demonstrate how (6) of the following elements of design are used: lines, circles, dots, shapes, colors, patterns, textures, space, balance, or perspective. To receive the art pin, groups will visit the gallery in our art area and discuss art on display. Create two self-portraits using two different art techniques such as drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture or computer illustration. Make a collage using several different materials and use your artistic skills to create a postage stamp, book cover, or music CD cover.
  • Collecting: View Creative Discovery Museum’s collection of fossils,living creatures or rocks and minerals.
  • Disabilities: Visit with a person with disabilities. Find out what this person enjoys and what this person finds difficult. To earn the pin for Disabilities Awareness, try to use a scooter, crutches, or a wheelchair. Using sign language, demonstrate the Cub Scout Promise and Motto. Explain how your school helps students with disabilities and describe the purpose of occupational therapy, speech therapy, or physical therapy. Visit a person who works in one of these fields and learn about his or her position.
  • Scientist: Explain the scientific method to your adult partner. Use the scientific method in a simple science project. Talk to an adult about the results. Visit with a Creative Discovery Museum, scientist. Earn the scientist pin by using simple machines to accomplish tasks, such as a lever, pulley, wheel-and-axle, inclined plane, and screw. Learn about solids, liquids, and gases by using water. Build models of two atoms and two molecules, using plastic foam balls or other objects. Label a drawing or diagram of the bones of the human skeleton. Make a model or poster of the solar system and label the planets and sun.
  • Weather: Make a poster that explains the water cycle. To earn the weather pin, define weather terms and explain how clouds are formed. Explain the differences between stratus, cumulus, cumulonimbus and cirrus clouds. Make a weather map of your state or country using several weather symbols. Explain the differences between tornadoes and hurricanes. Make a simple weather vane and list other weather instruments by describing what they do.

Pricing

Choose from an Overnight lock-in where your troop can sleep over or a Prime Time evening for just a few hours. Just remember to bring your adult leaders and come prepared to have fun!

  • Overnight: Scouts will receive full staff instruction, dinner, a snack, and breakfast. They will also receive time to explore the Museum. Cost is $30 per person and a minimum of $750 is required.
  • Prime Time: For the Prime Time evening option, Cub Scouts will receive dinner and a snack, as well as time to explore the Museum 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Cost is $20 per person and a $500 minimum required.

One adult per every five children is required for both options. Required chaperones receive free admission. Payment in full is due at time of registration.

Call Nancy at (423) 648-6045 or Beth at (423) 648-6040 for details or to make your reservation today! Lock ins are booked on a first come, first served basis.